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EXCHANGE OF LETTERS BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENTS OF INDIA AND POLAND REGARDING TRADE ARRANGEMENT [1951] INTSer 1

EXCHANGE OF LETTERS BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENTS OF INDIA AND POLAND REGARDING TRADE ARRANGEMENT

New Delhi, 6 January 1951

LETTERS REPRESENTATIVE OF THE POLISH MTNTSTRY FOR FOREIGN TRADE IN INDIA

New Delhi, the 6th January, 1961

Dear Mr. Desai, In the course of discussions that have taken place recently in the Minister of Commerce in New Delhi between representatives of Poland and India with a view to promoting trade between the two countries, during the period 1st January, 1951 to 31st Deeember, 1951 certain points have been mentioned that it will be of interest to place on record, viz.,

(1) The representatives on both sides expressed the desire to endeavour to expand the trade between the two countries as much as possible, and items that are in short supply in one country will be licensed for export from the other, in accordance with rules and regulations of the two Governments in force from time to time, and provided people of the trade or acknowledged trade enterprises, come to terms regarding prices and conditions through the normal channels.

(2) The representatives of the Government of India confirmed that within the currency groups there would be no territorial discrimination, and accordingly applications for licences for import of goods from Poland into India would be treated equally favourably with applications for import from any other country of the soft currency group in accordance with the licensing procedure in force from time to time, saving any exceptional commitment in particular trade agreements.

(3) The import licensing policy laid down by the Government of India for the period January-June, 1951, goes forth from a Public Notice issued by the Government of India, Ministry of Commerce, dated New Delhi, December 15th, 1950. Ceilings are fixed for specified items for the various currency groups. It is understood that the Public Notice may be amended from time to time.

(4) The imports into and exports from Poland and their licensing are based practically almost exclusively on bilateral trade agreements with quotas fixed for the various products or groups of products. Such agreements bind the Governments of the two countries concerned to grant import and export licences up to such amounts or quantities as mentioned in the agreements, provided the people of the trade and acknowleged trade enterprises find prices and conditions acceptable for the goods offered. In respect, however, of the commodities mentioned in Schedules A and B attached, it was agreed that Poland should treat India as a Trade Agreement country for reasonable quantities of these commodities as obtainable.

(5) The representatives of both sides agreed to give and assist in giving the widest possible publication to lists of goods available for export in both countries as and when required by the other party. Lists of some of the items available from Poland and India at the moment are enclosed at Schedules A and B respectively.

(6) Both the countries will inform each other of changes in their licensing policies and regulations as and when such changes are made.

(7) The two Governments will be pleased, to assist in arranging for contracts in various fields, but it is, of course, understood that resulting contracts, if any, will be made direct between the parties concerned in accordance with foreign exchange and other regulations in force. It is agreed that payments and other charges in connection with the imports and exports of goods between the two countries shall be settled in sterling. Any sterling due to Poland will be credited to the Polish Transferable Sterling Account.

(8) The lists of commodities mentioned in paragraph (5) of this letter are without prejudice to the right of persons or firms of either country entering into business transactions in respect of goods and commodities not forming part of these lists subject to and in conformity with the laws and regulations in force from time to time in either country.

(9) Poland has established a permanent shipping line between the ports of the two countries. Indian ships also ply between India and ports of the continent of Europe. It was agreed that question relating to shipping would be pursued later on.

(10) The Indian representatives requested that favourable consideration may be given to the requirements of India in respect of newsprint and lithophone. The Polish representative agreed to recommend to his Government this request for favourable consideration.

Yours sincerely,

(Sd.) BENEDYKT O. POLAK.

C.C. DESAT, Esquire, Secretary to the Government of India, Ministry of Commerce, New Delhi.


SCHEDULE A

LIST OF SOME OF THE GOODS AVAILABLE FROM POLAND FOR EXPORT TO INDIA

Serial No. 1. Commodity Raw zinc. 2. Zinc dust. 3. Zinc sheets (Normal commercial quality sheets and zinc gauge). 4. Water meters. 6. Steel bottles. 6. Dial indicators. 7. Optical glasses, optical instrumenb, cameras and accessories and microscopes. 8. Power driven agricultural machinery and their implements. 9. Textile machinery. 10. Machine tools. 11. Bicycles. 12. Spare parts for cycles. 13. Torch bulbs. 14. Electric numerators. 15. Transformers up to 600 KVA. 16. Pumps. 17. Appliances for mining purposes. 18. Wood screws.19. Black tools. 20. Sanitary ware. 21. Iron pipes. 22. Dyes. 23. Lithophone. 24. Licensable chemicals including arsenic oxide. 26. Window glasses. 26. Porcelain and porcelet. 27. Electrotechnical porcelain (H.T. Insulators). 28. Porcelain sanitary goods. 29. Electrodes. 30. Bentwood. 31. Brushes of all kinds. 32. Dextrine. 33. Potato syrup. 34. Potato starch. 35. Casein. 36. Tinned food. 37. Steel fibre (for fishing nets). 38. Cardboard and pasteboard.

SCHEDULE B

LIST OF SOME OF THE GOODS AVAILABLE FROM INDIA FOR EXPORT TO POLAND

Serial No. Commodity 1. Iron ore. 2. Manganese ore. 3. Shellac. 4. Myrobalan and myrobalan extracts. 5. Mica. 6. Cane. 7. Tea. 8. Pepper. 9. Provisions and oilman's stores except tinned milk and nulk products. 10. Hides and skins (peImissible types). 11. Tobacco. 12. Chemicals: Opium, snakes' poison, herbs and drugs. 13. Groundnut oil and linseed oil and castor oil for industrial purposes.


GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
MINISTRY OF COMMERCE

New Delhi, the 6th January, 1951.

Dear Mr. Polak.

I write to acknowledge receipt of your letter of today's date with enclosures. The letter reads as follows: "In the course of discussions that have taken place recently in the Ministry of Commerce in New Delhi between representatives of Poland and India with a view to promoting trade between the two countries, during the period 1st January, 1951, to 31st December, 1951, certain points have been mentioned that it will be of interest to place on record, viz.,

(1) The representatives on both sides expressed the desire to endeavour to expand the trade between the two countries as much as possible, and items that are in short supply in one country will be licensed for export from the other, in accordance with rules and regulations of the two Governments in force from time to time, and provided people of the trade or acknowledged trade enterprises, come to terms regarding prices and conditions, through the normal channels.

(2) The representatives of the Government of India confirmed that within the currency groups there would be no territorial discrimination, and accordingly applications for licences for import of goods from Poland into India would be treated equally favourably with applications for import from any other country of the soft currency group in accordance with the licensing procedure in force from time to time, saving any exceptional commitment in particular trade agreements.

(3) The import licensing policy laid down by the Government of India for the period January-June, 1951, goes forth from a Public Notice issued by the Government of India, Ministry of Commerce, dated New Delhi, December 15th, 1950. Ceilings are fixed for specified items for the various currency groups. It is understood that the Public Notice may be amended from time to time.

(4) The imports into and exports from Poland and their licensing are based practically almost exclusively on bilateral trade agreements with quotas fixed for the various products or groups of products. Such agreements bind the Governm,ents of the two countries concerned to grant import and export licences up to such amounts or quantities as mentioned in the agreements provided the people of the trade and acknowledged trade enterprises find prices and conditions acceptable for the goods offered. In respect, however, of the commodities mentioned in Schedules A and B, attached, it was agreed that Poland should treat India as a Trade Agreement country for reasonable quantities of these commodities as obtainable.

(5) The representatives of both side6 agreed to give and assist in giving the widest possible publication to lists of goods available for export in both countries as and when required by the other party. Lists of some of the items available from Poland and India at the moment are enclosed at Schedules A and B, respectively.

(6) Both the countries will inform each other of changes in their licensing policies and regulations as and when such changes are made.

(7) The two Governments will be pleased to assist in arranging for contracts in various fields, but it is, of course, understood that resulting contracts, if any, will be made direct between the parties concerned in accordance with foreign exchange and other regulations in force. It is agreed that payments and other charges in connection with the imports and exports of goods between the two countries shall be settled in sterling. Any sterling due to Poland will be credited to the Polish Transferable Sterling Account.

(8) The lists of commodities mentioned in paragraph (5) of this letter are without prejudice to the right of persons or firms of either country entering into business transactions in respect of goods and commodities not forming part of these lists subject to and in conformity with the laws and regulations in force from time to time in either country.

(9) Poland has established a permanent shipping line between the ports of the two countries. Indian ships also ply between India and ports of the continent of Europe. It was agreed that questions relating to shipping would be pursued later on.

(10) The Indian representatives requested that favourable consideration may be given to the requirements of India in respect of newsprint and lithophone. The Polish representative agreed to recommend to his Government this request for favourable The enclosures read as follows:

"SCHEDULE A

LIST OF SOME OF THE GOODS AVAILABLE FROM POLAND FOR EXPORT TO INDIA

Serial Commodity No.

1. Raw zinc. 2. Zinc dust. 3. Zine sheets (Normal commercial quality sheets and zinc gauge). 4. Water meters. 6. Steel bottles. 6. Dial indicators. 7. Optical glasses, optical instruments, cameras and accessories and microscopes. 8. Povver driven agricultural machinery and their implements. 9. Textile machinery. 10. Machine tools. 11. Bicycles. 12. Spare parts for cycles. 13. Torch bulbs 14. Electric numerators. 15. Transformers up to 600 KVA. 16. Pumps. 17. Appliances for mining purposes. 18. Wood screws. 19. Black tools. 20. Sanitary ware. Iron pipes. Dyes. Lithophone. Licensable chemicals including arsenic oxide. Window glasses. Porcelain and porcelet. Electro-technical porcelain (H.T. Insulators). Porcelain sanitary goods. Electrodes. Bentwood. Brushes of all kinds. Dextrine. Potato syrup. Potato starch. Casein. Tinned food. Steel fibre (for fishing nets). Cardboard and pasteboard.

SCHEDULE B

LIST OF SOME OF THE GOODS AVAILABLE FROM INDIA FOR EXPORT TO POLAND

Serial No.

1. Iron ore. 2. Manganese ore. 3. Shellac. 4. Myrobalan and myrobalan extracts. 5. Mica. 6. Cane. 7. Tea. 8. Pepper. 9. Provisions And oilman's stores except tinned milk and milk products. 10. Hides and skins (permissible types). 11. Tobacco. 12. Chemicals: opium, snakes' poison, herbs and drugs. 13. Groundnut oil and linseed oil and castor oil for industrial purposes. " Commodity 1. I confirm that this sums up correctly the result of discussions between the representatives of India and Poland.

2. I would add, however, that the position explained in paragraphs 2 and 3 of your letter in subject to an exception in respect of neighbouring countries and exports by country craft.

Yours sincerely,

(Sd.) C.C. DESAI.

BENEDYKT O. POLAK' Esq.,
Representative of the Polish Ministry for Foreign Trade, New Delhi.

TRADE AGREEMENT FOR.1952

LETTERS REPRESENTATIVE OF THE POLISH MINISTRY OF FOREIGN TRADE IN INDIA

New Delhi, the 27th March, 1962.

Dear Mr. SUKTHANKAR,

I refer to our recent discussions regarding trade between India and Poland and confirm my Government's agreement to the extension by a further period of one year from the 1st of January, 1952 of the arrangement set out in the letters exchanged between the representatives of the two Governments on the 6th of January, 1951.

2. The review of the arrangement for 1951 has disclosed the possibility of a further increase in trade between the two countries. My Government will take every step ' to increase the import of Indian commodities into Poland. 3. I am also to refer to the understanding reached in the course of our discussions that the Governments of both countries would extend to each other berthing and bunkering facilities as are available at their respective Ports for foreign going ships with a view to fostering and developing trade between the two countries.

Yours sincerely,

(Sd.) BENEDYKT O. POLAK.

Y.N. SUKTHANKAR Esq., I.C.S., Secretary, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, New Delhi.


GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
MINISTRY OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY

New Delhi, the 27th March, 1962.

Dear Mr. POLAK,

1. I write to acknowledge receipt of your letter of today's date, which reads as follows:

(Not Printed)

2. I confirm that this sums up correctly the result of the discussions between the representatives of India and Poland, subject to the remark that in the grant of the licences for the import of goods from Poland into India, Poland will be treated equally favourably with all other countries comprised in the currency group to which Poland may belong, save any special commitment entered into by India in a Bilateral Trade Agreement.

Yours sincerely,

(Sd.) Y.N. SUKTHANKAR

BENEDYKT O. POLAK, Esq.,
Representative of the Polish Ministry of Foreign Trade, Hotel Imperial, New Delhi.


TRADE AGREEMENT FOR 1953 REPRESENTATIVE OF THE POLISH MINISTRY OF FOREIGN TRADE

New Delhi, the 1st June 1953.

Dear Mr. BHOOTHALINGAM.

1. I refer to our recent discussions regarding trade between the Polish People's Republic and the Republic of India and confirm my Government's agreement to the extension of the arrangements set out in the letters exchanged between the representatives of the two Governments on the 6th January, 1951 and the 27th March, 1952, for a further period of two years commencing from the 1st of Janury, 1953, subject to the substitution of the revised Schedules 'A' and 'B' attached hereto for those referred to therein.

2. If for any reason it should become difficult for either Government to implement this arrangement, I am to confirm my Government's agreement that negotiations may be entered into at the instance of either Government with a view to the modification of this arrangement as necessary.

3. The review of the arrangement for 1952 has disclosed the possibility of a further increase in trade between the two countries and I am to record also the understanding reached in the course of our discussions that both Governments will take such steps as may be necessary to increase imports from either country.

4. I further confirm the agreement reached during our discussion that both the Governments of Poland and India would use their best endeavours to promote the shipping of the two countries and that they would give a fair and equitable treatment to all questions arising in this connection. Ships under Polish or Indian Registry shall be accorded in the ports of the other party the usual facilities in respect of bunkering and other services and the customary treatment in respect of duties, charges and taxes in accordance with the regulations in force from time to time in each country. No ships of either party shall have the right to participate in the coastal trade of the other party.

5. I am also recording the understanding that if a particular commodity is not mentioned in Annex. 'A' or 'B', it will not in itself exclude the possibility of its importation from either of the country subject to the respective import and export regulations. 6. This agreement will be deemed to have come into effect from the 1st January, 1953 and shall remain in force until the 31st December, 1954, save for Schedules 'A' and 'B' which will cease to have effect after the 31st December, 1953 unless extended by mutual agreement between the contracting parties and subject to such modifications as they may consider necessary. I should be grateful to have your confirmation that this letter correctly sets out the understanding reached between the representatives of both respective Governments.

Yours sincerely,

(Sd.) BENEDYKT O. POLAK.

S. BHOOTHALINGAM, Esq., Joint Secretary, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, New Delhi.


SCHEDULE A

LIST OF SOME OF THE GOODS AVAILABLE FOR EXPORT FROM POLAND TO INDIA

1. Water meters. 2. Pressure gauges and dial indicators. 3. Optical glasses, optical instruments, photocameras and appliances, microscopes, microscope lamps for microphotographics. 4. Textile machineries and parts thereof. 5. Woodworking machineries and parts thereof. 6. Toreh bulbs. 7. Electric meters. 8. Transformers up to 500 KVA. 9. Water pumps (power driven). 10. Hardware, iron mongery and tools, all sorts, excluding machine tools and agricultural implements. 11. Iron sanitary ware. 12. Horse-shoe nails. 13. Wire nails. 14. Laboratory equipments (not made of glass or rubber). 15. Carbon electrodes. 16. Sheet and plate glass including wired and figured glass. 17. Porcelain, Electro-technical porcelain and porceletware. 18. Porcelain sanitary ware. 19. Dyes. 20. Chemicals. 21. Brushes of all kinds except tooth brushes and brooms. 22. Office machines. 23. Potato syrup. 24. Casein. 25. Woollen felt for hats. 26. Woollen fabrics. 27. Cardboards and pasteboards. 28. Printing paper. 29. Newsprint. 30. Packing paper. 31. Parchment paper. 32. 33. 34. Appliances for mining purposes. Iron pipes. Pianos.

SCHEDULE B

LIST OF SOME OF THE GOODS AYAILABLE FOR EXPORT FROM INDIA TO POLAND

1. Iron ore. 2. Manganese ore. 3. Mica. 4. Shellac. 6. Myrobalan and mvrobalan extracts. 6. Cane. 7. Tea. 8. Spices including pepper. 9. Tobacco. 10. Cashew nuts. 11. Raw goats skins and sheep skins known as Amritsar papra. 12. Tanned hides and skins. 13. Groundnut oil and linseed oil and castor oil. 14. Hydrogenated oils. 15. Essential oils including sandalwood oil, palmarosa oil and lemongrass oil. 16. Coir and Coir manufactures. 17. Silk and art silk fabrics. 18. Fibre for brushes and broorr.s. 19. Sports goods. 20. Chemicals: opium, snakes' poison, herbs and drugs. 21. Provisions and oilman's stores except tinned milk and milk products.


GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
MINISTRY OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY

1st June1953
3 New Delhi

Dear Mr. POLAK, , I write to acknowledge receipt of your letter of today's date with enclosures. The letter reads as follows: "I refer to our recent discussions regarding trade between the Polish People's Republic and the Republic of India and confirm my Government's agreement to the extension of the arrangements set out in the letters exchanged between the representatives of the two Governments on the 6th January, 1951, and the 27th March, 1952, for a further period of two years commencing from the 1st of January, 1953, subject to the substitution of the revised Schedules 'A' and 'B' attached hereto for those referred to therein.

2. If for any reason it should become difficult for either Government to implement this arrangement, I am to confirm my Government's agreement that negotiations may be entered into at the instance of either Government with a view to the modifications of this arrangement as necessary.

3. The review of the arrangement for 1952 has disclosed the possibility of a further increase in trade between the two countries and I am to record also the understanding reached in the course of our discussions that both Governments will take such steps as may be necessary to increase imports from either country.

4. I further confirm the agreement reached during our discussion that both the Governments of Poland and India would use their best endeavours to promote the shipping of the two countries and that they would give a fair and equitable treatment to all questions arising in this connection. Ships under Polish or Indian Registry shall be accorded in the ports of the other party the usual facilities in respect of bunkering charges and taxes in accordance with the regulations in force from time to time in each country. No ships of either party shall have the right to participate in the coastal trade of the other party.

5. I am also recording the understanding that if a particular commodity is not mentioned in Annexure 'A' or 'B', it will not in itself exclude the possibility of its importation from either of the country subject to the respective import and export regulations.

6. This agreement will be deemed to have come into effect from the 1st January, 1953, and shall remain in force until the 31st December, 1954, save for Schedules 'A' and 1l' which will cease to have effect after the 31st December, 1953 unless extended by mutual agreement between the contracting parties and subject to such modifications as they may consider necessary.

7. T should be grateful to have your confirmation that this letter correctly sets out the understanding reached between the representatives of both respective Governments." I confirm that this sums up correctly the result of discussions between the representatives of India and Poland.

Yours sincerely, (Sd.)

S. BHOOTHALINGAM.

BENEDYKT O. POLAK, Esq., Representative of the Polish Ministry of Foreign Trade, New Delhi.


REPRESENTATIVE OF THE POLISH MINISTRY OF FOREIGN TRADE

New Delhi, the 1st June, 1953.

Dear Mr. BHOOTHALINGAM,

During the discussions regarding the extension for a further period of two years of previous Indo-Polish trade arrangements, representatives of the Government of India informed me that certain commodities (as per Schedule 'C' attached) which it was proposed to include in the Polish list of exports to India would have to be deleted from the said list either because the import was banned or because the Government of India's import policy had not been announced. I should be grateful to have your confirmation that in the event of the Government of India permitting the import of the goods now excluded from the Polish list of exports, there would be no objection to their inclusion in the list of goods available for export from Poland. I should be grateful to have your confirmation that this letter correctly sets out the understanding reached between the representatives of our respective Governments.

Yours sincerely,

(Sd.) BENEDYKT O. POLAK.

S. BHOOTHALINGAM, Esq., Joint Secretary, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, New Delhi.


SCHEDULE C

Serial No. 1. Agricultural machineries and implements. 2. Lithophone. 3. Bentwood furniture. 4. Roasted chikory. Commodity


MINISTRY OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY
GOVERNMENT OF INDIA

New Delhi, the 1st June, 1953.

Dear Mr. Polak,

I am in receipt of your letter of even date, which reads as follows:

(Not Printed )

I confirm that in the event of the Government of India permitting the import of goods now excluded from the Polish list of exports to India, there will be no objection to their inclusion in the said list.

Yours sincerely,

(Sd.) S. BHOOTHALINGAM.

BENEDYKT O. POLAK, Esq., Representative of the Polish Ministry of Foreign Trade, New Delhi.


TRADE AGREEMENT FOR 1954

REPRESENTATIVE OF THE POLISH MINISTRY OF FOREIGN TRADE

the 30th March, 1954. New Delhi,

Dear Mr. IENGAR,

I refer to our recent discussions regard.ng the revision of schedules for the year 1954 for incorporation in the trade arrangement between Poland and India set out in the letters exchanged between the representatives of the two Governments on 1st June 1953. We were glad to note the growing desire in both the countries to increase the development of mutual trade. As agreed. fresh Schedules 'A' and 'B' copies of which are attached should form part of the letters for 1954.

Yours sincerely,

(Sd.) BENEDYKT O. POLAK.

H.V. R. IENGAR,
Esq., Secretary to the Government of India, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, New Delhi.

SCHEDULE 'A'

LIST OF SOME OF THE GOODS AVAILABLE FOR EXPORT FROM POLAND TO INDIA

1. Sugar factories. 2. Refrigerator plants. 3. Railway workshops equipment. 4. Cement and concrete factories. 5. Locomotives of normal and narrow gauge and spare parts. 6. Passenger carriages, special types. 7. Sleeping cars, special types. 8. Freight cars, special types. 9. Fire fighting engines. 10. Metal and wood-working machineries. 11. Watchmakers lathes. 12. Roll turning roughing lathes. 13. Turret lathes. 14. Single-spindle automatic lathes. 15. Universal relieving lathes. 16. Locomotive and tender wheel lathes. 17. Lathes for turning and rolling wagon and tender wheels. 18. Single column vertical turret lathes. 19. Double column vertical boring mill. 20. Universal milling machines. 21. Longitudinal two spindle milling machines. 22. High speed vertical milling machines. 23. Horizontal boring and milling machines. 24. Radial drilling machines. 25. Double housing planers. 26. Universal cylindrical grinders. 27. Hydraulic cylindrical grinders. 28. Surface grinding machines. 29. Universal tool grinders with special equipment. 30. Hard alloy tool grinders. 31. Double wheel grinders. 32. Circular saw sharpening machines. 33. Drill grinders. 34. Belt sanding grinders. 35. Circular saws. 36. Horizontal boring and slot mortising machines. 37. Band sawing machines. 38. Circular saw benches with boring attachment. 39. Circular saws. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. Cross cutting circular saws. Three side thicknessing and planing machines. Moulding machines with tenoning attachment. Automatic planer-knives sharpening machinos. Double saw edgers. Wood turning lathes. Hydraulic planet-knives sharpening machines. Chain merizing machines. 48. Crushing plants for minerals. 49. Contractor plants and machineries. 50. Concrete mixers with electric motors. 51. Through mixers. 52. Power bar benders. 53. Power shear machines. 54. Conveyors. 55. Concrete friction winches. 56. Electric winches with reduction gearing. 57. Textile machineries. 58. Paper manufacturing machineries. 59. Mining plants and machineries. 60. Belt conveyors. 61. Scrapper conveyors. 62. Armoured conveyors "Pancer" type. 63. Mining loaders. 64. Driving units. 65. Capstans. 66. Pneumatic hammers. 67. Drilling machines. 68. Cutteróloaders "Donbas" type. 69. Hoisting plants. 70. Power cranes. 71. Derrick cranes. 72. Forging equipment. 73. Compressor hammers. 74. Double and quadruple acting wing pumps. 75. Motor-driven slime water pumps. 76. SmaU tools and workshop equipment. 77. Hacksaw blades and frames. 78. Electric drills. 79. Electric bench and hand grinders. 80. Breast hard drills. 81. Reducing valves. 82. Baking ovens. 83. Dough kneading machines with electric motors. 84. Shaking sifter with electric motors. 85. Flour sack dusting machines with electric motors. 86. Mixing machines "More" U1 for bakers and confectioners. 87. Single and double flour mill rollers. 88. Agricultural machineries and implements. 89. Tractors. 90. Electrical equipment and materials. 91. Motors. 92. Oil transformers. 93. Measuring instruments. 94. Electricity meters. 95. Installation equipments, such as: Rotary and tumbler switches, sockets, plugs, torch bulbs, fuse, lampholders fittings, Borgmann conduits, etc. 96. Central fire alarm signalling stations. 97. Cast iron water main pipes. 98. Cast iron soil pipes. 99. Malleable iron tube fittings. 100. Cast iron enamelled Sanitary goods. 101. Hardware, ironmongery and tools, all sorts. 102. Arsenic white. 103. Aluminium potassium sulphate. 104. C austic potash. 106. Chrome oxide. 106. Ammonium chloride. 107. Ammonium bicarbonate. 108. Sodium bichromate crystalline. 109. Sodium bichromate fused. 110. Sodium hyposulphite. 111. Bone glue. 112. Trichloroethylene. 113. Soda ash. 114. Oxalic acid. 115. Active carbon. 116. Insecticides. 117. Coal tar dyes. 118. Insulatingarticles"Denso". 119. Paints and lacquers. 120. Ultramarine. 121. Pharmaceuticals, serums and vaccines, laboratory chemicals, essential oils and cosmetic articles. 122. Arc-lamp carbon electrodes. 123. Laboratory equipment. 124. Surgical instruments and veterinary instruments. 125. Optical glasses, optical instruments, photo cameras and appliances, microscopes, micro scopic lamps for microphotograph. 126. Newsprint. 127. Printing paper. 128. Writing paper. 129. Packing paper. 130. Parchment paper. 131. Cardboards and pasteboards. 132. Fancy papers. 133. Stationery. 134. Photographic papers, X-ray films, positive films. 135. Domestic glassware. 136. Sheet and plate glass including figured and wired glass. 137. Lighting glass. 138. Glass bottles including feeding bottles. 139. Sanitary earthenware. 140. Electro-porcelain. 141. Porcelain end porceletware. 142. Casein. 143. Powdered eggs. 144. Feathers for industrial purposes. 145. Tinned fish. 146. Tinned meat. 147. Tinned ham. 148. Beet-root crystal sugar. Toys, dolls and tree decorations. 172. Gramophone-records and needles. 173. Pianos. 174. Postage stamps/Philatelic. 175. Handicraft and cottage industry products; amber and wood products. 176. Polish films (exposed). Seed potatoes. Beer malt. Potato starch. Glucose for industrial purposes. Confectionery. Preserved fruits, vegetables and honey. Medicinal herbs. Alcoholic drinks, Vodka, etc. Chikory and roasted chikory. Cotton piecegoods. Woollen fabrics. Rayons. Cotton plushest Haberdashery. Cotton sewing thread. Woollen felt for hats. Oil cloth. Oil lamp wicks. Bynthetic fishing line. Rubber footwear. Brushes of all kinds. Buttons.

SCHEDULE 'B'

LIST OF SOME OF THE GOODS AVAILABLE FOR EXPORT FROM INDIA TO POLAND

1. Iron ore. 2. Manganese ore. 3. Mica. 4. Shellac. 5. Myrobalan and myrobalan extracts. 6. Cane. 7. Tea. 8. Spices including pepper. 9. Tobacco, raw and unmanufactured. 10. Cashew nuts. 11. Raw goat skins and sheep skins known as Amritsar papras. 12. Tanned hides and skins (buffaloes and others). 13. Linseed oU and castor oil. 14. Hydrogenated oUs. 15. Essential oils including sandal wood oU, palma rosa oil and lemon gra" oil. 16. Cordage and ropes of vegetable fibre including coir and coir products. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. SUk and art silk fabrics. Fibre for brushes and brooms. Sports goods. Chemicals: Opium, snakes' poison, herbs and drugs. Provisions and oilman's stores except tinned milk, and milk products and sago rice. Raw cotton. Coffee raw. Wool raw. Wool waste. Handicraft and cottage industry products, e.g, ivory products, brass and bidriware, silver filigree, grass and fibre products and wood carvings; 27. Indian films (exposed). 28. Gum tragacanth.


GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
MINISTRY OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY

dated the 30th March 1954.
New Delhi

Dear Mr. POLAK,

I write to acknowledge receipt of your letter of today's date. The letter reads as follows:

(Not Printed)

I confirm that this sums up correctly the result of the discussions oetween the Representatives of India and Poland.

Yours sincerely,

(Sd.) H.V.R. IENGAR.

BENEDYKT O. POLAK, Esq., Representative of the Polish Ministry of Foreign Trade, New Delhi.


ARRANGEMENT RENEWED FOR 1956

LETTERS AMBASADA POLSKIEJ RZECZYPOSPOLITEJ LUDOWEJ

New Delhi, dated the 3rd March 1955

Dear Mr. IENGAR,

I refer to our recent discussions regarding trade between the Polish People's Republic and the Republic of India and confirm my Government's agreement to the extension of the arrangements set out in the letters exchanged between the Representatives of the two Governments on the 1st June 1953 and the 30th March 1954, for a further period of one year commencing with the 1st January, 1955. As agreed, Schedules 'A' and B', copies of which are attached, should form part of this letter.

2. I am to confirm my Government's agreement that the Polish People's Republic may establish Trade Representations in Bombay and Calcutta to promote and look after the trade relations between India and the Polish People's Republic. The details essential for the setting up of the Trade Representations in Bombay and Calcutta should be agreed upon between the two Governments before the Trade Representations in question start functioning.

3. If for any reason it should become difficult for either Government to implement this arrangement, or it should become necessary at a later date to negotiate an arrangement relating to the payments for commercial and non-commercial transactions between India and Poland, I am to confirm my Government's agreement that negotiations may be entered into at the instance of either Government with a view to the conclusion of a supplementary arrangement relating to payments. This arrangement will be deemed to have come into effect from the 1st January 1955 and shall remain in force until the 31st December, 1995. 5. I should be grateful to have your confirmation that this letter correctly sets out the understanding reached between the Representatives of both the respective Governments.

Yours sincerely,

(Sd.) JERZY GRUDZINSKI.

H.V.R. IENGAR, ESQUIRE
Secretary to the Government of India, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, New Delhi.


SCHEDULE 'A'

LIST OF SOME OF THE GOODS AVAILABLE FOR EXPORT FROM POLAND TO INDIA

1. sugar Factorie8. 2. Refrigerator plants. 3. Railway workshop equipments. 4. cement and concrete factories. 5. Locomotive Of normal and narrow gauge and spare parts. 6. Passenger carriages special types. 7. Sleeping cars, special types. 8. Freight care, special types. 9. Fire fighting engine9. 10. Metal and wood-working machineries. 11. Watchmakers lathes. 12. Roll turning roughing lathes. 13. Turret lathes. 14. Single spindle automatic lathes. 15. Universal relieving lathes. 16. Locomotive and tender wheel lathes. 17. Lathes for turning and rolling wagons and tender wheels. 18. Single column vertical turret lathes. 19. Double column vertical boring mill. 20. Universal milling machines. 21. Longitudinal two spindle milling machinec. 22. High speed vertical milling machines. 23. Horizontal boring and milling machines. 24. Radial drilling machines. 25. Double housing planers. 26. Universal cylindrical grinders. 27. Hydraulic cylindrical grinders. 28. Surface grinding machines. 29. Univeral tool grinders with special equipment. 30. Hard alloy tool grinders. 31. Double wheel grinders. 32. Cireular saw sharpening machines. 33. Drill grinders. 34. Belt sanding grinders. 36. Cireular saws. 36. Horizontal boring and slot mortising machines. 37. Band sawing machines. 38. Cireular saw benches with boring attachment. 39. Cross eutting eireular saws. 40. Three side thieknessing and planing machines. 41. Moulding machines with tenoning attachment. 42. Automatic plane-knives sharpening machines. 43. Double saw edgers. 44. Wood turning lathes. 46. Hydraulie plane-knives sharpening machines. 46. Chain merizing machines. 47. Crushing plants for minerals. 48. Contraetor plants and machineries. 49. Conerete mixers with eleetrie motors. 60. Through mixers. 61. Power bar benders. 62. Power shear machines. 63. Conveyors. 64. Conerete friction winches. 66. Eleetrie winches with reduction gearing. 66. Textile machineries. 67. Paper manufacturing machineries. 68. Mining plants and machineries. 59. Belt conveyors. 60. Seraper conveyors. 61. Armoured conveyors "Paneer" type. 62. Mining loaders. 63. Driving units. 64. Capstans. 66. Pneumatie hammers. 66. Drilling machines. 67. Cutter-loaders "Donbas" type. 68. Hoisting plants. 69. Power cranes. 70. Derriek cranes. 71. Forging equipment. 72. Compressor hammers. 73. Double and quadruple acting wiring pumps. 74. Motor-driven slime water pumps. 76. Small tools and workshop equipment. 76. Haekeaw bladea and frames. 77. Eleetie drills. 78. Eleetrie bench and hand grinders. 79. Breast hand drills. 80. Redueing valves. 81. Baking ovens. 82. Dough kneading machines with electric motors. 83. Shaking sifter with electric motors. 84. Flour sack dusting machines with electric motors. 86. Mixing machines "More" U1 for bakers and confectioners 86. Single and double flour mill rollers. 87. Agricultural machineries and implements. 88. Traetors. 89. Eleetrical equipment and materials. 90. Motors. 91. Oil transformers. 92. Measuring instruments. 93. Eleetricity meters. 94. Installation equipments, such as: Rotary and tumbler switches, sockets, plugs, torch bulbs, fuses, lampholder fittings, Bergmann conduits, etc. 95. Central fire alarm signalling stations. 96. Cast iron water main pipes. 97. Cast iron soil pipes. 98. Malleable iron tube fittings. 99. Cast iron enamelled sanitary goods. 100. Hardware, ironmongery and tools, all sorts. 101. Arsenic white. 102. Aluminium potassium sulphate. 103. Caustic potash. 104. Chrome oxide. 106. Ammonium chloride. 106. Ammonium bichromate. 107. Sodium bichromate crystalline. 108. Sodium bichromate fused. 109. Sodium hyposulphite. 110. Bone glue. 111. Trichloroethylene. 112. Soda ash. 113. Oxalic acid. 114. Aetive carbon. 116. Inseeticides. 116. Coal tar dyes. 117. Insulatin garticles"Denso". 118. Paints and lacquers. 119. Ultramarine. 120. Pharmaceuticals, serums and vaccines, laboratory chemicals, essential oils and cosmetic articles. 121. Are-lamp carbon electrodes. 122. Laboratory equipments. 123. Surgical instruments and veterinary instruments. 124. Optical glasses, optical instruments, photo cameras and appliances, microscopes, microscopic lamps for microphotograph. 126. Newsprint. 126. Printing paper. 127. Writing paper. 128. Packing paper. 129. Parchment paper. 130. Cardboards and pasteboards. 131. Fancy papers. 132. Stationery. 133. Photographic papers, X-ray films, positive films. 134. Domestic glassware. 135. Sheet amd plate glass including figured and wired glass. 136. Lighting glass. 137. Glass bottles including feeding bottles. 138. Sanitary earthenware. 139. Electro-porcelain. 140. Porcelain and porceletware. 141. Casein. 142. Powdered eggs. 143. Feathers for industrial purposes. 144. Tinned fish. 145. Tinned meat. 146. Tinned ham. 147. Beet-root crystal sugars. 148. Seed potatoes. 149. Beer malt. 150. Potato starch. 151. Glucose for industrial purposes. 152. Confectionery. 153. Preserved fruits, vegetables and honey. 154. Medicinal herbs. 155. Alcoholic drinks, Vodka, etc. 156. Chicory and roasted chicory. 157. Cotton piecegoods. 158. Woollen fabrics. 159. Rayons. 160. Cotton plushes. 161. Haberdashery. 162. Cotton sewing thread. 163. Woollen felt for hats. 164. Oil cloth. 165. Oil lamp wicks. 166. Synthetic fishing line. 167. Rubber footwear. 168. Brushes of all kinds. 169. Buttons. 170. Toys, dolls and tree-decorations. 171. Gramophone-records and needles. 172. Pianos. 173. Postage stamps/philatelic. 174. Handicraft and cottage industry products; amber and wood products. 175. Polish films (exposed).

SCHEDULE B

LIST OF SOME OF THE GOODS AVAILABLE FOR EXPORT FROM INDIA TO POLAND

1. Iron ore. 2. Manganeee ore. 3. Mica. 4. Shellac. 5. Myrobalan and myrobalan extracts. 6. Cane. 7. Tea. 8. Spicen including pepper. 9. Tobacco, raw and manufacture. 10. Cashew nuts. 11. Raw goat skins and sheep skins known as Amritsar papras. 12. Tanned hides and skins (buffaloes and others). 13. Linseed oil and castor oil. 14. Hydrogenated oils. 15. Essential oils including sandal wood oil, palmarosa oil and lemon-grass oil. 16. Cordage and ropes of vegetable fibre including coir and coir products. 17. Silk and art silk fabrics. 18. Fibre for brushes and brooms. 19. Sports goods. 20. Chemicals: Opium, snakes' poison, herbs and drugs. 21. Provisions and oilman's stores except tinned milk, and milk products and sago rice. 22. 23. 24. 26. 26. Raw cotton. Coffee raw. Wool raw. Wool waste. Handicraft and cottage industry products, e.g., ivory products, brass and bidriware, silver filigree, grass and fibre products and wood carvings. 27. Indian films (exposed). 28. Gum tragacanth.


GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
MINISTRY OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY

New Delhi, dated the 3rd March, 1955

Dear Mr. GRUDZINSKI,

I write to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of your letter which reads as follows:

(Not Printed)

I confirm that the position stated therein correctly sets out the understanding reached between us.

Yours sincerely,
(Sd.) H.V.R. IENGAR.

H.E. Mr. JERZY GRUDZINSKI,
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Embassy of Poland, New Delhi.


TRADE ARRANGEMENT EXTENDED UPTO 31 MARCH, 1956

LETTERS AMBASADA POLSKIEJ RZECZYPOSPOLITEJ LUDOWEJ

New Delhi, dated the 31st December, 1955.

Dear Mr. IENGAR,

I have the honour to refer to the discussions which took place during the recent visit of H.E. Mr. Konstanty Dabrowski, Minister for Foreign Trade, Government of Poland, to India with the representatives of the Government of India. It was clear from these discussions that there is considerable scope for the expansion of trade between Poland and India, and that it would be fruitful to discuss the possibilities in greater detail. The Government of Poland propose to send out shortly a delegation to India to hold these detailed discussions. It is, therefore, considered that pending the result of these discussions the current Trade Agreement, as also Schedules "A" and '`B" attached thereto, should be extended ad interim up to the end of March, 1956. I should be grateful, if you would please confirm the foregoing.

Yours sincerely,

(Sd.) JERZY GRUDZINSKE

H.V.R. IENGAR, Esquire,
Secretary to the Government of India, Ministry of Commerce and Industry, New Delhi.


GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
MINISTRY OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY

New Delhi, dated the 31st December, 1955.

Dear Mr. GRUDZINSKI,

I write to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of your letter which reads as follows:

(Not Printed)

I confirm that the foregoing correctly sets out the position.

Yours sincerely,

(Sd.) H.V.R. IENGAR.

H.E. Mr. JERZY GRUDZINSKI,
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Embassy of Poland, New Delhi.


Finland - Trade 9 May 1949

In regard to the year 1950, the Government of India would examine the country's requirements of plywood for tea chests at a later date taking into account production in the country as also other relevant factors."

The letter correctly sums up the result of discussions between the representatives of the Government of India and yourself.

Yours sincerely,

(C.C. DESAI).

ERIC AHEQVIST, Esquire, Maidens Hotel, Delhi.


India Bilateral

Ministry of External Affairs, India


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